Audio-Engineering

Changing of the Guard...

In my fourteen (!) years teaching and lecturing at RMIT University’s Sound Production program in Audio Engineering I have had the pleasure to meet many wonderful people. But the time comes when creative choices begin to outweigh the financial decisions made prior to meet the needs of parenting and raising two children. In 2020 there will be a Changing of the Guard so to speak as I reduce my teaching tenure to a few days per week allowing more time for making records and playing jazz. Academic life has regrettably supported a focus on narrower and narrower aspects that underly our creativity, so I now yearn to address this imbalance. Over the next year my graduate from many years ago and now colleague, Mark Kelson will be gradually prepared to take over the duties I shall step away from. This gives me great pleasure to know the program I have developed with a wonderful team of others will remain in hands that are inspired and engaged in the art of engineering… whilst I again focus upon actual creativity. I need to acknowledge and pay utmost respect to my fellow team members at RMIT who have been absolute stalwarts in the success of this program: Michael “Smasha” Pollard, Timothy Johnston, John Phillips and Paul Thomas. Previous program managers Jen Anderson and Bruce Jacques were also instrumental in both developing this program but importantly assembling this particular team of awarded engineers and creators; all of whom are still fully engaged outside of their teaching roles. Thank you x

Mark Kelson and I in Studio One, featuring the 1st NEVE Genesys console in AUST.

Mark Kelson and I in Studio One, featuring the 1st NEVE Genesys console in AUST.

Confirm your sources...

We live in a time of information overload. There’s never a lack of “news” available should we ever get bored, but not all information is correct or reliable.  

If we are to move through our current state of uncertainty in the world with conflicting opinions on climate, immigration, politics and more, then our decision to follow a particular viewpoint needs to be thoroughly investigated.  

Dont be lazy when it comes to informing yourself. Don’t believe the most seemingly supported news but rather be prepared to dig deeper and avail yourself with accurate information so our viewpoints can be both educated and considered.

As humans we have evolved to require stories, which provide us with meaning to our existence. These stories give each of us a role to play upon the stage of life but in order to believe these stories they have to extend beyond our current horizons. I’m all for storytelling but perhaps your imagination of being capable of mastering after reading a post on the Book of Faces is not all that informed - nor correct? 

Confirm your sources... 

Why We Teach...

Today marks the beginning of another year in teaching Audio Engineering and it's related sub-fields. This is the part I love; disseminating as much of my knowledge that I can whilst embracing everything I am still yet to learn. So teaching is always a two-way street; I learn from my students who learn from me.

I began teaching in this field part-time in 2003, went full-time in 2006 and was finally offered tenure in 2007, which meant I wasn't effectively "unemployed" from New Year's Eve 'til New Year's Day. So over a decade now and the actual teaching element is still as exciting for me as ever. I am very grateful to have such a fulfilling job that serves to feed my children and I but above all that I am blessed that my students actually enjoy my teaching.

Lecture/Class #1 for 2018 to my new cohort of 1st years and one particular student states at the end of the two hours "thank you - you're a fantastic teacher - the best I've ever had."

Phükk! Thank you. Let the journey for me continue whilst for others the journey has only just begun...

Let Down Your Hair

Just returned from the cinema where I took the kids to see Disney's "Tangled." Some may scoff at this post but I have to comment on the production values; nothing short of incredible. The musical theatre-type songs are not my bag but I couldn't help appreciate the recordings and the mixes. Full orchestral works and immaculate vocals, without a hint of the dreaded Auto-Tune processing. The overall tone was warm and rich and I intend to follow up on the audio-team listed in the credits. For those sincerely interested in an Audio-Engineering career I strongly suggest you have a serious listen to the score of this "kids movie." If you can get over the musical-theatre compositions the arrangements are superb. I recommend this to any parents out there too. (Wish I still had long, golden, magical hair!)